Understanding Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs while presenting the iPad in San Fr...

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I did a Google search on “Steve Jobs and Education” which followed from a link to a talk and article by, of all people, Rupert Murdoch about schools, entitled, “The Steve Jobs Model for Education Reform“.

The subtitle was….  If we can engage a child’s imagination, there’s no limit to what he or she can learn.

This was the sort of thing that I have always been  going on about (among others of course), so I decided that I would do the search on Google mentioned above.

This led me to a post called “Steve Jobs on Education” . As is the way with these internet trails I followed a link to this:

This was a 1995 Smithsonian Institution interview with Steve Jobs after he had been fired from Apple and was working on NeXT and also Pixar animations.

This was the transcript of the whole interview by Daniel Morrow and makes for fascinating reading. It contains a lot of details from Steve about his life, his background and in particular his childhood and his education. There are some powerful references to the role that his father played in the development of his interest in electronics and the fortune that he had in having moved to Silicon Valley at the age of five and growing up in an environment that celebrated innovation and experimentation.

The focus of the interview was very much one of education and Steve makes a number of interesting points about why the education system did not then (and does not now) allow children to develop their real talents and abilities.

I found a number of his ideas about the developments that technology can bring and also their limitations to be very interesting.

I think this interview is a real neglected gem if you are looking into the motivations and personality of the man that was Steve Jobs and has some important ideas that are still needing to be looked at in 2011 some 16 years since the interview was recorded.

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