How to create the perfect TED Talk

This is a great talk about using a data analysis of great (and bad) TED Talks by Sebastian Wernicke. He looks at the results of data using the language, colours, dress sense and other factors in order to create a matrix that will allow any future TED Talk writer/presenters to deliver the perfect talk.

He has obviously taken on board the results of his own statistical analysis because the audience absolutely loved it and he got a huge and enthusiastic standing ovation.

I felt that he had taken a leaf out of the book of the great Hans Roslin and given a lot of geeky technical, data rich observers a really well illustrated talk using a lot of humour. From my own reactions to having watched many TED Talks, he is right in saying that there are certain things to avoid and certain tricks that will grab an audience and get you the standing ovation and the invitation to talk all over the world and the chance to sell your forthcoming (or just released) book.

This is not to deride the dead-straight dramatic, serious talk. If you are going down that line, fill the stage with interesting objects and wear something bright or have just yourself, highlighted, in quite dull clothing (they are here to listen and you are making your point immediately).

Do not ramble and try and use interesting slides, photos, snippets of videos or a Prezi to make your points stand out. Try not to read long quotes and always walk around a bit (unless you are doing the dead straight, dull clothed, look at me and listen talk).

Sebastian provides a useful tool for those wanting to use his data analysis, which can be found at www.get-tedpad.com it is highly recommended, as is the talk which manages to achieve the feat of being a great TED Talk about TED Talks!

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