Signing off for now

I have decided, after 625 posts over a period of over three years to have an extended break from blogging.

Since I started this blog my life has changed in a number of ways. I have stopped working, I have retired, I have moved to a different part of the country and my time is largely spent supporting my wife and in studying various MOOCs.

I have found myself having less and less time to research and write blog posts.

I have had over 75000 views of my posts, which averages 25000 a year, so not too bad. I have 45 regular followers which I am very grateful for.  To all who have read my work I extend my thanks.

I shall not be closing down my blog as a number of posts have regular views.It also holds open the possibility that I shall write a post in the future. A blog is a great place to express your ideas and there my well come a time that I will feel that I need such a place to shout out or reflect.

So for now, as the title says I am signing off…. with thanks to you all.

What Letter Should We Add to STEM?

http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/381238/what-letter-should-we-add-to-stem/

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The video has a number of well known academics stating their support of the arts (and humanities seems to be added as a “tie-on”) to accompany  Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) which has got so much attention in the media and has become a big concern of no less a person than President Obama!

They all agree that the arts and humanities leads to a rounded education and supports work in the other disciplines.

I would go further and say that the arts and humanities support the thinking and social skills that help students to learn STEM and without them the effects of concentrating on just these subjects would be undermined.

I think the statement in the video that resonated with me was Professor Howard Gardiner who said that a STEM education without the arts was a “halfbaked education”. Hear, hear.

Politicians and global warming

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I love this sculpture. It is by Issac Cordal in Berlin, Germany and is called “Politicians discussing global warming”.

I don`t need to add anything to what so many of you are no doubt thinking.This sculpture cuts to the heart of the situation. Do we really need to be swamped by an ever-rising and non- shrinkable tide of water whilst our politicians discuss and agree to talk about the subject at some future date?

I would take this photo as a starting point for discussion about Global Warming in schools. Students need to consider the whole debate and to understand the possible ramifications of non-action.